Monday, July 30, 2007

For those of you who wonder what exactly I do at entrepreneurship conferences, here's one session I helped put together ... (I'm also presenting on entrepreneurial passion and on the "double helix" model of entrepreneurial development -- the one that Idaho uses!)

OK, so you want to learn how social entrepreneurship
i
s worth all the buzz? Whether you've been at it for a while or a complete newbie, this is for you!
These are the 'best & brightest' and include those who first brought social & sustainable entrepreneurship to academe (Johanna, me, Ana Maria). A wonderful confluence of teaching, research and community engagement!

Ping me at norris.krueger@gmail.com, if I can be of any help!


SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP:
ADVANCES IN RESEARCH & PRACTICE


Academy of Management Preconference –
Saturday, 4 August, 2007; 12 Noon to 3:30 PM

Social entrepreneurship is a premier example of "doing well by doing good." This workshop, specifically designed for doctoral students, explores the following questions. What are the prevailing ideas regarding social entrepreneurship? How are scholars explaining social entrepreneurship? How should social entrepreneurship be explored as a field of study? What are the challenges in pursuing this area of research?

Our goal in this workshop is to provide a venue for discussion and exploration of topics in this emerging area of research. Doctoral students interested in this topic are encouraged to attend. Social entrepreneurship is a premier example of "doing well by doing good." In recent years theoretical and empirical research on social
entrepreneurship has increased. For example, several professional development workshops and papers on social entrepreneurship were presented, well attended and applauded at the Academy of Management, Babson and ICSB meetings in 2006. This workshop is an extension and enhancement of a rapidly self-organizing community of research around the theme of social and sustainable entrepreneurship and economic development. This inclusive community of scholars and practitioners will share their research including theoretical developments, best
practices in teaching and profiles of global social entrepreneurs.

The relevance of social entrepreneurship has been recently validated by the Nobel Peace prize awarded to Muhammad Yunus, the founder of Grameen Bank. Professor Yunus has had significant collaboration with Ashoka Fellows before and since his election as a founding member of Ashoka's Global Academy in 2001. Professor Yunus will be directing some of his $1.4 million Nobel Peace Prize Award towards building eye hospitals for the poor in Bangladesh. The idea, sparked by Ashoka Fellow David Green in collaboration with his own organization, Project
Impact, and eyecare partners Aravind and Seva Foundation, will develop an initial five eye hospitals in Bangladesh.

Another significant event that illustrates the importance of the social dimension of entrepreneurship was the conference "Business as an Agent of World Benefit: Management Knowledge Leading Positive Change". This Global Forum, which was sponsored by The Academy of Management and The United Nations Global Compact, was held "October 22nd-25th at Case Western Reserve University and online uniting top business leaders and educators to focus on ways of doing business that are both profitable and succeed in addressing the world's most
pressing social needs. This event united corporate and thought leaders to combine theory with practice to develop strategies for businesses seeking to respond to social issues like the environment, health and poverty while also making a profit." Panelists Ana Maria Peredo & myself attended that - an intriguing exercise.

Participants will present their recent research and best practices to the audience which would then be invited to share their experiences and lessons learned in round table discussions facilitated by the panelists. The intent of this interactive workshop is to expand, enrich and enhance the development of a community of research on
social entrepreneurship. The outcomes of the workshop should include collaborations for articles, books and additional workshops on this important topic. A summary of the outcomes of the workshop will be drafted and shared with colleagues at Ashoka, USASBE, ICSB, AIB and other interested scholars, foundations, organizations and practitioners around the world to build stronger bridges and increase traffic over those connections.

This workshop will have break out sessions that will explore the following questions. What are the prevailing ideas regarding social entrepreneurship? How are scholars explaining social entrepreneurship? How should social entrepreneurship be explored as a field of study? What are the challenges in pursuing this area of
research? What are the best practices in teaching social entrepreneurship? What are some of the best practices of social entrepreneurs that can be used as case studies? How can we obtain funding for research on theory and practice of social
entrepreneurship? What are possible publication outlets for our research? What are the best strategies for getting published in quality peer reviewed journals?

AGENDA (3.5 HOURS)
I. Welcome and Overview of Session (20 minutes)
II. Research Perspectives Presentations (50 minutes)
III. Best Practices (Cases and Teaching) (50 minutes)
IV. Coffee/ soft drink break (10 minutes)
V. Breakouts Sessions with facilitators (30 minutes)
VI. Lessons Learned - Report out from breakouts (30 minutes)
VII. Concluding Remarks (20)

DETAILED AGENDA

I. Welcome and Overview
Recent Conferences on Social Entrepreneurship Research and Practice
Jeff Robinson – Summary report on the NYU event in April (10 minutes)
Kai Hockerts- Summary Report on ISERC3 (10 minutes)

II. Applied Research Perspectives (10 minutes each)
a. Johanna Mair & Ignasi Marti (Institutional View of SE)
b. Norris Krueger (Cognitive [entrepreneurial learning] View of SE)
c. Ana Maria Peredo (Community Entrepreneurship View of SE)
d. Alan Carsrud & Moriah Meysken (Evolutionary View of SE)
e. Questions

III. Practice (10 minutes each)
a. Dianne Welsh (Art House Project)
b. Bayou Bill Schulte (Beyond Intent: Social Actions of Entrepreneurs)
c. Bob D'Intino (Social Entrepreneurship Education/ Micro lending)
d. Susan Davis (Ashoka Update)
e. Tom Dean (invited) (social venture competition)
f. Questions

IV. Introductions of Participants and Roundtable Sessions (Schulte,
Robinson, et al.)

V. Lessons Learned - Report out from Roundtables (facilitators)

VI. Concluding Remarks: Toward a Community of Research and Practice on
Social Entrepreneurship and Suggestions for future publishing and research opportunities (Bill Schulte)

VII. Adjourn and Social Networking

You will NOT want to miss this!
--
Keep entrepreneuring!
Norris


Norris Krueger, Jr., Ph.D.
Teams / Entrepreneurship Northwest
"How can I help YOU to help grow entrepreneurs?"
(208) 440-3747; skype: norris.krueger
"I criticize by creation, not by finding fault" -Cicero

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